Social Events Programme 2019

 

March 12th Annual General Meeting
April 21st Easter Egg Hunt
May 11th Play Park Cleanup
May 19th Open Gardens
June 30th Summer Picnic
September 7th Litter Pick
October 13th Autumn Harvest Lunch
November 3rd Litter Pick
December 15th Carols

 

NGS Gardens Open for Charity Sunday 19th May 2019 1pm – 6pm

Six members of our Garden Group are once again opening their beautiful gardens to the public for charity as part of the National Garden Scheme.  These dedicated gardeners have participated in the scheme for many years and work extremely hard to put on a good show every year. The Association is very proud of their efforts which raise hundreds of pounds for charity each year and we are very privileged to have so many stunning gardens to look at on our small patch of south east London.  As an added incentive there are extra attractions at some of the gardens (see below), including: tea and delicious cakes; live music; and plant and art sales.
So please do come along for a lovely afternoon on the Hill and see these very different, but equally wonderful, gardens.
Combined admission is £8 (children free) and tickets are available at all the gardens.  The gardens participating this year are:
53 Ringmore Rise  (teas and music); 27 Horniman Drive (plant sales); The Coach House, 3 The Hermitage (sales of gardne sculptures & ceramics); Hilltop, 28 Horniman Drive; 25 Westwood Park; and 7 Canonbie Road (plant sales).
garden
Donations go to St Christopher’s Hospice and Marsha Phoenix Trust.
More details can be found here www.ngs.org.uk/find-a-garden/garden/30170/ 

AGM & Aircraft Noise

The Tewkesbury Lodge Residents Association will be held on Tuesday 12 March between 6.30-8pm at Horniman Primary School.

Some residents have noticed a change in the pattern and regularity of aircraft overflying Forest Hill as well as an  increase in noise levels. Please click the link below for our news sheet giving further details.

Aircraft Noise

Valentine’s Day Butterfly

Today, February 14th, I saw my first butterfly of the year. It was large and lemon coloured and against the clear blue sky it was a thing to behold. Or that is what its behaviour was intended to impress upon male rivals and female potential mates. The Brimstone is usually the first butterfly of the year to emerge. Today’s one would have hibernated through the Winter in evergreen cover such as Holly or Ivy and then the sudden warmth of today’s weather would have awoken it from hibernation.
When the female is eventually fertilised, she will lay her eggs on the leaves of a buckthorn bush or small tree. These have small white flowers, thorns, and later in the year simple leaves and then black berries: beneath the bark the wood is yellow. The next time you wonder about removing a small inconspicuous shrub that is growing at the back of a border look out for the tell tale yellow below the bark. If it is a Buckthorn keep it, for the sake of the Brimstone.

Image result for brimstone butterfly
And as our climate changes for the hotter, more of these delightful insects will survive the Winter and so become part of our Spring time garden life.
Stuart Checkley

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